27.09.2018 - 03.11.2018

Alexandros Laios - Annealing Point

The visible red light has the longest wavelength, while red falls last in the visible light spectrum order. This visual phenomenon, observed during the afternoon hours, was the reason for Alexandros Laios to detect marginal moments and snapshots of the day.

The visible red light has the longest wavelength, while red falls last in the visible light spectrum order. This visual phenomenon, observed during the afternoon hours, was the reason for Alexandros Laios to detect marginal moments and snapshots of the day. Starting with the appearance of an unexpected trace and slowly reaching the sunset both as a theme as well as a universal experience pertaining to the way we perceive notions such as myths and endings, Laios attempts to identify the means that are capable of such a narrative.

The installations of the exhibition take the form of notes on the day that passed by. We observe shapes made of theater lighting gels, -absolute forms-, where unexpected elements and traces of everyday life, such as a speck of dust, have become visible to the light. Their interference, fertile and plentiful, has submitted the shapes in a resistance test, as it happens with natural materials.

This is what the title of the exhibition refers to; the absolute resistance limit that a material such as glass or metal, or even a mere word perceived as such, acquires. The annealing point* is a turning point, as well as a point of reference for the material itself, as it will reach its final form through this process.

Alexandros Laios was born in Athens in 1979. He studied painting at the Athens School of Fine Arts (2000-05). He completed his post-graduate studies in Visual Arts at the Athens School of Fine Arts (2007-09). He is a founding member of Under Construction group. He has participated in group exhibitions in Greece and abroad. Lives and works in Athens, Greece.